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Making the Case for Character Education


There are a lot of subjects taught in school but one that often gets overlooked is character education. It’s something that brings great value to the lives of students and the communities they live in. It helps influence their decision-making skills and shape their values. Children as young as Kindergarteners benefit from character education in the classroom.

The Six Pillars of Character
The six pillars of character include Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship. In the 1980s, the Supreme Court acknowledge that public schools are the perfect vehicle for learning core values. Unfortunately, character education isn’t a part of many educational institute’s curriculums.

Character Education Involves the Entire Community
When implemented in a school setting, it shapes student’s beliefs and actions. Schools are encouraged to make staff, students, and their parents active participants in character education. That way, areas of emphasis are determined by the community.

How It Benefits Students, Homes, and Communities
Character education training improves classroom interactions, lessens the need for disciplinary actions, and helps shape the future of students who rely on their training to do right by the world. It also gives parents and the community the skills needed to consistently speak about desirable character traits to students.

The Importance of Shaping Young People’s Future Through Beliefs and Actions
Making the case for character education is much simpler than it looks. It involves a commitment from educators and parents alike. Character education is something that is overlooked but necessary in schools around the country. It helps shape children’s moral values and helps them grow into well-rounded, rule-abiding citizens.

By accessing the right resources, educators can teach character education in a way that resonates with youth. It’s something they can communicate to other members of the school district as well as the parents of the students being taught. Communities are strengthened by character education and students that become exemplary citizens because of their strong moral values, infinite amount of respect, and desire to do the right thing at all times.

More Books About Hacking Education for You to Buy and Read

More Books About Hacking Education for You to Buy and Read

As an educator, effective communication is the key to meeting learning objectives. To get the message across to your students, you adopt a different way of delivering information in the classroom. Essentially, you work smarter not harder.

Some additional titles about hacking education that you’ll want to check out include:

 • Hacking Education: 10 Quick Fixes for Every School (Hack Learning Series) (Volume 1) by Mark Barnes and Jennifer Gonzalez. How schools approach challenges that get in the way of learning determines how successful their students are at overcoming obstacles. In Volume 1 of the Hack Learning Series, the authors address barriers to learning. They explain how to overcome negative attitudes, technology issues, lack of resources, and interruptions in planning time. It’s chock full of strategies that help you tap into your innate hacker mentality. A simple formula helps you implement hacks inside the classroom right away. First, you address the problem. Next, you identify the right hack and follow the step-by-step action plan. Finally, you see the hack in action because you’re able to put it to use right away.

 • Hacking Google for Education: 99 Ways to Leverage Google Tools in Classrooms, Schools, and Districts (Hack Learning Series) (Volume 11) by Brad Currie, Billy Krakower, and Scott Rocco. Get ready to change the way you use Google. It’s not just for browsing the web, it’s also for learning, communicating, and innovating. This guide is broken down into 33 chapters with 99 hacks to put to good use in the classroom. It tells you how to use Google Maps, Tours, Slides, and more to transform the learning environment inside your classroom, school, and district.